Latest James Webb image shows a ‘phantom galaxy’

The image of the eerily glowing galaxy was based on data nearly a million miles from our planet (Image: Twitter/@gbrammer)

This is the month of the James Webb Space Telescope that shone amazing images of deep space back to earth.

As more data from the telescope becomes publicly available through the The MAST archive of the Space Telescope Science Instituteastronomers have begun to conduct their own analyses, creating astonishing images.

Last week, Gabriel Brammer, an associate professor at the University of Copenhagen, composed and shared such an image showing the galaxy Messier 74.

Judy Schmidt, who has been working with space images for ten years, shared an image yesterday called “Phantom Galaxy.” The image of the eerily glowing galaxy was based on data nearly a million miles from our planet using the observatory’s mid-infrared instrument (MIRI).

Scientists believe the ‘Phantom Galaxy’ has a medium-mass black hole embedded in its heart.

‘I’ve been doing this for 10 years now, and [Webb] data is new, different and exciting,” Schmidt told Space.com. ‘Of course I’m going to make something with it’

The image highlights the dust lanes in the galaxy, better known as NGC 628 or Messier 74. Some astronomers consider it the “perfect spiral” because the galaxy is so symmetrical.

The galaxy has been professionally imaged many times, including by space observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).

Schmidt reportedly used Photoshop and FITS Liberator for most of the work and said many of the concepts in her 2017 YouTube Imaging Tutorial will help with today’s more advanced software.

Scientists believe the ‘Pantom Galaxy’ has a medium-mass black hole embedded in its heart (Image: Twitter/ @SpaceGeck)

These latest images from the James Webb telescope differ from previous images of the galaxy because of the mid-infrared range that highlights cosmic dust, along with the power of its unique 18-segment hexagonal mirror and its location in deep space.

A selection of raw Webb images will be made public on this websitea few hours or days after the sightings, so that amateur photographers and scientists are free to investigate, as long as they cite the source when publishing.

NASA’s James Webb telescope has already captured breathtaking images of nebulae from galaxies thousands – some even billions – of light years from Earth.

These were broadcast to the world a few weeks ago and contain images of Jupiter and its moon Europa.

MORE: NASA’s Hubble Telescope Captures Globular Cluster in Latest Image

MORE: NASA Shares First James Webb Telescope Images of Jupiter and Moon Europa

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